Annapolis Institute

A note of thanks to the “greatest”

Original publication date: May 29th, 1999 A few days ago I received an e-mail from a friend, an attorney who reads a lot and is thoughtful about what he reads. He had a good idea for Memorial Day. “Like many other Americans,” he began, “I have been reading Tom Brokaw’s The Greatest Generation. As you…

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Don’t mess with Americans’ lawns

Original publication date April 22nd, 1999 I went bike-riding this past weekend. The weather was mild and people were working in their yards. The smell of fertilizer and fresh-cut grass filled the air. All of a sudden it hit me: Focus group-driven political leaders who increasingly rail against suburbs, “sprawl” and automobiles may be in…

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Election verdict: Less is better

Original publication date April 16th, 1999. The tsunami we predicted in this column on Oct. 12 — Republican control of Congress for the first time in 40 years — happened on Nov. 8. However, the majority that carried the election is not, in my judgment, a New Republican Majority — as many Republicans are saving.…

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Unlike Some, Newt Knew When To Quit

Original publication date: November 10th, 1998 Until last Friday, when House Speaker Newt Gingrich resigned, one could rightfully ask, “Whatever became of the fine art of resignation?” Until Friday, the leader of the Republican majority in Congress and the second most powerful political leader in the land, was clinging to his office in the face…

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True believers enlist the EPA

Original publication date: July 30th, 1998 The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is positioning itself to impose what economist and policy analyst Mark Mills calls “an expanded and stunning new regulatory burden” on the U.S. economy. Here’s the story. Since 1993 and the ill-fated tax on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, the Clinton-Gore administration has been trying to…

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‘Big Sky’ primary would shift power

If the 10 states of the Intermountain West (including the Rocky Mountain and Pacific Northwest states) can agree on a common date for a year 2000 Western regional presidential primary — what my colleague Rick O’Donnell and I call the “Big Sky” primary — then a new and more influential role for the New West…

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The West wields expanding power

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Rapid population growth in the West and unprecedented gains by the Republican Party in the region are dramatically changing America’s political landscape and will greatly expand the influence of the Western region on national politics. This is one of the punchlines of “Western Political Outlook,” a new report released today at the…

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Reforms could make cities work

Talk to anyone about cities and the conversation quickly moves to negatives — to issues like crime and violence, traffic congestion, schools that don’t work, poverty, decay, racial tensions and divisions, out-of-control taxing and spending and, too often, out-of-control police and self-serving politicians. But that’s not the way it has to be. Cities are also…

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Schools fall short on values, virtues

Society’s most important task is education. It is through education that we transmit to our children the knowledge and skills they need to function effectively in a modern economy, and the values and virtues they require to fulfill the responsibilities of family and citizenship in a free society. That’s why all that separates civilization from…

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Presidents Day a poor substitute

In the old days, Americans celebrated the birthday of the man who is regarded as the “Father of his Country,” owing to his service to our nation – as commanding general during the Revolutionary War and as our founding president. His name was George Washington and we celebrated his birthday on Feb. 22. For more…

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